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redis: All content tagged as redis in NoSQL databases and polyglot persistence

Redis - Pick the Right Data Structure

Brian O’Rourke in a post with tips about Redis:

Here’s our standard reference table for Redis datatypes, their most common uses, and their most common misuses.

Redis Pick the Right Data Structures

Even if most of these are just common sense, it’s good to have some sort of cheat sheet around when modeling your data.

Original title and link: Redis - Pick the Right Data Structure (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://www.redisgreen.net/blog/2013/02/18/redis-201/


NoSQL Bug Fix Releases: Redis 2.6.10 and RavenDB 2.01

The RavenDB team has released mostly a bug fix new version RavenDB 2.01. The change log is here.

Redis also has a new bug fix release: 2.6.10 including non-critical fixes and 5 small improvements. Change log is here

Original title and link: NoSQL Bug Fix Releases: Redis 2.6.10 and RavenDB 2.01 (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


NoSQL Hosting: Redis and RavenDB

More service providers for hosted NoSQL solutions:

  1. Garantia Data to Offer its Redis & Memcached Hosting Services in Europe: “In-memory NoSQL Company extends Redis Cloud and Memcached Cloud to European Amazon Web Services users.”
  2. CloudBird Launch, now with RavenDB 2.0 support - The CloudBird Blog: “Today we’re cracking open the Champagne as we peel off the beta label and officially welcome production databases to our RavenDB hosting service. What’s more we’re also introducing support for the Raven 2.0 RTM.”

It’s not anymore just “a database for every taste”, but steadly becoming more of “a database for every taste served from anywhere you like”,

Original title and link: NoSQL Hosting: Redis and RavenDB (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Get Your Redis on Windows with Redis Hobo

Jason Punyon about the somehow alleviated hassle of getting Redis to work on Windows using redishobo:

TL;DR: Want a virtual machine running redis in however long it takes you to download 400MB + a little completely automated install time? Follow the instructions here and you’ll be on your way.

Vagrant is great, but the user experience it’s still not awesome for a great tool like Redis. I’m wondering when Microsoft will pull themselves together to maintain a Redis fork that actually works on Windows.

Original title and link: Get Your Redis on on Windows With Redis Hobo (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://jasonpunyon.com/blog/2013/01/28/get-your-redis-on-on-windows/


Redis-Stat: Redis Monitoring With Netflix’s Hystrix Flavor

A very early stage of a Redis monitoring tool using hiredis1and express2 on Node.js presenting a dashboard inspired by Netflix’s Hystrix3:

redis-stat2

The project is on GitHub so you can send some pull requests with improvements.

Original title and link: Redis-Stat: Redis Monitoring With Netflix’s Hystrix Flavor (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


11 Interesting Releases From the First Weeks of January

The list of releases I wanted to post about has been growing fast these last couple of weeks, so instead of waiting leaving it to Here it is (in no particular order1):

  1. (Jan.2nd) Cassandra 1.2 — announcement on DataStax’s blog. I’m currently learning and working on a post looking at what’s new in Cassandra 1.2.
  2. (Jan.10th) Apache Pig 0.10.1 — Hortonworks wrote about it
  3. (Jan.10th) DataStax Community Edition 1.2 and OpsCenter 2.1.3 — DataStax announcement
  4. (Jan.10th) CouchDB 1.0.4, 1.1.2, and 1.2.1 — releases fixing some security vulnerabilities
  5. (Jan.11th) MongoDB 2.3.2 unstable — announcement. This dev release includes support for full text indexing. For more details you can check:

    […] an open source project extending Hadoop and Hive with a collection of useful user-defined-functions. Its aim is to make the Hive Big Data developer more productive, and to enable scalable and robust dataflows.


  1. I’ve tried to order it chronologically, but most probably I’ve failed. 

Original title and link: 11 Interesting Releases From the First Weeks of January (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Redis Partial Resynchronization PSYNC, Plus Philosophy, Trade-Offs, and Making Decisions When Creating Tools for People to Use

There are way, way too many things I’d want to quote from Salvatore’s post. They are about the philosophy of a strong product, they are about the trade-offs that go into engineering solid but friendly products, they are about making decisions and not allowing misconceptions or old bad experiences have a bad influence on what you are building. You must read it.

Original title and link: Redis Partial Resynchronization PSYNC, Plus Philosophy, Trade-Offs, and Making Decisions When Creating Tools for People to Use (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://antirez.com/news/47


Using Beaver to Ship Log Files via Redis to Logstash

Beaver’s explicit goal is to provide a shipper that can be used in environments where one or more of the following is true:

  • Operations cannot support the JVM on an instance
  • Developers are more experienced with debugging Python performance issues
  • The server does not have enough memory for a large JVM application
  • Simply shipping logs to an intermediary for later processing is enough

What I’m not very clear about is the need for Redis, but I assume the main reasons could be: 1) logstash doesn’t accept pushed events; or 2) logstash might drop/lose events if pushed to0 fast.

Original title and link: Using Beaver to Ship Log Files via Redis to Logstash (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://josediazgonzalez.com/2013/01/01/setting-up-beaver-for-use-with-logstash/


What Is Thredis?

Gregory Trubetskoy about his Thredis project:

Thredis is Redis + SQL + Threads. Or perhaps it’s pure lunacy resulting from some mad winter hacking mixed with eggnog. Or perhaps it’s the first hybrid SQL/NoSQL server. You be the judge.

I only wish the community is not taking Redis this direction.

Original title and link: What Is Thredis? (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://thredis.org/


Using Redis for Monitoring Systems

R.I.Pienaar:

Monitoring systems generally need a number of different types of storage. These are configuration, event archiving and status and alert tracking. There are more but these are the big ticket items, of the 3 I am only going to focus on the last one – Status and Alert Tracking here.

Basically:

  1. record status using Redis hashes
  2. track staleness using Redis sorted sets
  3. trigger event notifications and track alerts using Redis PUB/SUB

Original title and link: Using Redis for Monitoring Systems (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://www.devco.net/archives/2013/01/06/solving-monitoring-state-storage-problems-using-redis.php


Redis Mass Data Import: MySQL to Redis in One Step

Derek Watson:

In moving a relatively large table from MySQL to Redis, you may find that extracting, transforming and loading a row at a time can be excruciatingly slow. Here’s a quick trick you can use that pipes the output of the mysql command directly to redis-cli, bypassing middleware and allowing both data stores to operate at their peak speed.

Nice trick. Which by the way was documented on the Redis site. With some more work (worth for larger data sets), you could actually generate a Redis RDB file directly.

Original title and link: Redis Mass Data Import: MySQL to Redis in One Step (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://dcw.ca/blog/2013/01/02/mysql-to-redis-in-one-step/


Redis Partial Resyncs and Synchronous Replication

Speaking about what I think to be a wrong decision in MongoDB replication, I’ve found the following in a post about Redis replication:

If a slave lost the connection, it connects again, see if the master RUNID is the same, and asks to continue from a given offset. If this is possible, we continue, nothing is lost, and a full resynchronization is not needed. Otherwise if the offset is about data we no longer have in the backlog, we full resync.

The last part made me think that the behavior of Redis’s replication is exactly the same as the one described by the OP when losing data on the secondary node after setting up replication. But it is the first part that makes the difference: the slave checks first if the master is the same.

Original title and link: Redis Partial Resyncs and Synchronous Replication (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://antirez.com/news/45