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graphdb: All content tagged as graphdb in NoSQL databases and polyglot persistence

Purely awesome - Chess Games and Neo4j

I wasn’t able to follow the post. I got myself lost into the superb presentation built for it. Chess game replays. Dynamic graphs. Pure awesomeness.

This is by far the most entertaining blog entry presentation I’ve seen since I’ve start reading and writing about NoSQL.

standingovation

Original title and link: Purely awesome - Chess Games and Neo4j (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://gist.neo4j.org/?6506717


On the topic of importing data into Neo4j

This post authored by Rik van Bruggen mentions the use of Talend ETL tool which brought an import job down from 1 hour to a couple of minutes:

This is where it got interesting. The spreadsheet import mechanism worked ok - but it really wasn’t great. It took more than an hour to get the dataset to load - so I had to look for alternatives. Thanks to my French friend and colleague Cédric, I bumped into the Talend ETL (Extract - Transform - Load) tools. I found out that there was a proper neo4j connector that was developed by Zenika, a French integrator that really seems to know their stuff.

There’s also a short video demoing Talend:

✚ I’ve mentioned what I see as the complexity of importing data into graph databases in On Importing Data into Neo4j

Original title and link: On the topic of importing data into Neo4j (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://blog.neo4j.org/2013/07/fun-with-music-neo4j-and-talend.html


On Importing Data into Neo4j

For operations where massive amounts of data flow in or out of a Neo4j database, the interaction with the available APIs should be more considerate than with your usual, ad-hoc, local graph queries.

I’ll tell you the truth: when thinking about importing large amounts of data into a graph database I don’t feel very comfortable. And it’s not about the amount. It’s about the complexity of the data. Nodes. Properties of nodes. Relationships and their properties. And direction.

I hope this series started by Michael Hunger will help me learn more about graph database ETL.

Original title and link: On Importing Data into Neo4j (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://jexp.de/blog/2013/05/on-importing-data-in-neo4j-blog-series/


Titan: Data Loading and Transactional Benchmark

The Aurelius team describing an advanced benchmark of Titan, a massive scale property graph allowing real-time traversals and updates, sponsored by Pearson, developed and run over 5 months:

The 10 terabyte, 121 billion edge graph was loaded into the cluster in 1.48 days at a rate of approximately 1.2 million edges a second with 0 failed transactions. These numbers were possible due to new developments in Titan 0.3.0 whereby graph partitioning is achieved using a domain-basedbyte order partitioner.

✚ The answer to why Titan is built on Cassandra can be found in this interview between Aurelius CTO Matthias Broecheler and DataStax co-founder Matt Pfeil:

[…] we don’t have to worry about things like replication, backup, and snap shots because all of that stuff is handled by Cassandra. We really just focus on: “How do you distribute a graph?”, “How do you represent a graph efficiently in a big table model?”, “How do you do things like etched compression and other things that are very graph specific in order to make the database fast? And, lastly, “How do to build intelligence index structures so that the graphs traversals, which are the core of any graph database, so that those are as fast as possible?”

Original title and link: Titan: Data Loading and Transactional Benchmark (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://www.planetcassandra.org/blog/post/educating-the-planet-with-pearson


Neo4j 1.9 General Availability - Auto-clustering, Cypher, and Some comments

The 1.9 release adds primarily three things:

  1. Auto-Clustering, which makes Neo4j Enterprise clustering more robust & easier to administer, with fewer moving parts
  2. Cypher language improvements make the language more functionally powerful and more performant, and
  3. New welcome pages make learning easier for new users
  1. The first is for the enterprise customers and brings in the features that were initially supported through ZooKeeper
  2. Cypher is Neo4j’s fast evolving query language
  3. The site is brilliant.
  4. The release post is terrible with no links to dive into the newly announced features.

Original title and link: Neo4j 1.9 General Availability - Auto-clustering, Cypher, and Some comments (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://blog.neo4j.org/2013/05/neo4j-19-general-availability.html


Neo4j Blog: Reloading my Beergraph - using an in-graph-alcohol-percentage-index

Rik Van Bruggen about data modeling in Neo4j:

One of the things that spurred the discussion was - probably not coincidentally - the AlcoholPercentage. Many people were expecting that to be a property of the Beerbrand - but instead in my beergraph, I had “pulled it out”. The main reason at the time was more coincidence than anything else, but when you think of it - it’s actually a fantastic thing to “pull things out” and normalise the data model much further than you probably would in a relational model. By making the alcoholpercentage a node of its own, it allowed me to do more interesting queries and pathfinding operations - which led to interesting beer recommendations. Which is what this is all about, right?

I can see where this is going, but I’m not sure I agree it’s the right approach. Basically in this case it works because the domain of the field is both discrete and small. Ideally, though, what you’d actually want is an index that could give you nodes that are “close-to-some value” (e.g.: “give me the beers in the 6.9-7.1 range”)

Original title and link: Neo4j Blog: Reloading my Beergraph - using an in-graph-alcohol-percentage-index (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://blog.neo4j.org/2013/05/reloading-my-beergraph-using-in-graph.html


Bootstrapping Neo4j With Spring-Data...without XML

The emphasis is on without XML:

With the maturing of Spring-Data I started porting all my personal projects to use Spring Data for bootstrapping.

Quite a bit of annotations needs, but I’d go with that instead of XML.

Original title and link: Bootstrapping Neo4j With Spring-Data…without XML (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://codepitbull.wordpress.com/2013/05/12/bootstrapping-neo4j-with-spring-data-without-xml/


A Quick Guide to Testing Spring Data Neo4j With NoSQLUnit

Alex Soto:

Spring Data Neo4j is the project within Spring Data project which provides an extension to the Spring programming model for writing applications that uses Neo4j as graph database. To write tests using NoSQLUnit for Spring Data Neo4j applications, you do need nothing special apart from considering that Spring Data Neo4j uses a special property called type in graph nodes and relationships which stores the fully qualified classname of that entity.

Is there a BigDataUnit framework? My only requirement is to use XML. Heavily.

Original title and link: A Quick Guide to Testing Spring Data Neo4j With NoSQLUnit (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://www.javacodegeeks.com/2013/03/testing-spring-data-neo4j-applications-with-nosqlunit.html


Neo4j-Based Bitcoin Block Chain Visualizer

Pretty interesting usage of Neo4j for visualizing Bitcoin block chain:

BlockViewer

Source code available on GitHub.

Original title and link: Neo4j-Based Bitcoin Block Chain Visualizer (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: https://github.com/thallium205/BitcoinVisualizer


Adding Value Through Graph Analysis Using Titan and Faunus

Interesting slidedeck by Matthias Broecheler introducing 3 graph-related tools developed by Vadas Gintautas, Marko Rodriguez, Stephen Mallette and Daniel LaRocque:

  1. Titan: a massive scale property graph allowing real-time traversals and updates
  2. Faunus: for batch processing of large graphs using Hadoop
  3. Fulgora: for global running graph algorithms on large, compressed, in-memory graphs

The first couple of slides are also showing some possible use cases where these tools would prove their usefulness:

Original title and link: Adding Value Through Graph Analysis Using Titan and Faunus (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


A Human-Readable Jackrabbit Persistence Manager Prototype for Orientdb

Jackrabbit still has a very special place in my heart. I’ve fought it many times, sometimes losing, most of the time winning. But for over 7 years now, it is still the main storage engine serving the content of InfoQ. So this OrientDB engine for Jackrabbit by Thomas Kratz caught my attention:

This has some limitations, as jackrabbit will still access only one node at a time, being able to traverse the graph at the storage level is simply not intended by the whole api. But it works, it’s readable, can be modified at the db level easily.

Original title and link: A Human-Readable Jackrabbit Persistence Manager Prototype for Orientdb (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://thomaskratz.blogspot.de/2013/01/a-human-readable-jackrabbit-persistence.html


Neo4j Interviews: The Vision, the Business and Enterprise Talk, and the Tech

Over the weekend I’ve watched two interviews with people working on Neo4j. Each of them covers it from a different angle: Ian Robison’s interview is the technical one, while Emil Eifrem is giving more of the vision, business, enterprise interview. Pick the type of topic you like and watch it. Both are great though.

If you like going back in time, I’ve found a couple of old presentations from and interviews with Emil Eifrem:

Original title and link: Neo4j Interviews: The Vision, the Business and Enterprise Talk, and the Tech (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)