ALL COVERED TOPICS

NoSQL Benchmarks NoSQL use cases NoSQL Videos NoSQL Hybrid Solutions NoSQL Presentations Big Data Hadoop MapReduce Pig Hive Flume Oozie Sqoop HDFS ZooKeeper Cascading Cascalog BigTable Cassandra HBase Hypertable Couchbase CouchDB MongoDB OrientDB RavenDB Jackrabbit Terrastore Amazon DynamoDB Redis Riak Project Voldemort Tokyo Cabinet Kyoto Cabinet memcached Amazon SimpleDB Datomic MemcacheDB M/DB GT.M Amazon Dynamo Dynomite Mnesia Yahoo! PNUTS/Sherpa Neo4j InfoGrid Sones GraphDB InfiniteGraph AllegroGraph MarkLogic Clustrix CouchDB Case Studies MongoDB Case Studies NoSQL at Adobe NoSQL at Facebook NoSQL at Twitter

NAVIGATE MAIN CATEGORIES

Close

HortonWorks: All content tagged as HortonWorks in NoSQL databases and polyglot persistence

Hortonworks: the Red Hat of Hadoop

However, John Furrier, founder of SiliconANGLE, posits that Hortonworks, with their similar DNA being applied in the data world, is, in fact, the Red Hat of Hadoop. “The discipline required,” he says, “really is a long game.”

It looks like Hortonworks’s positioning has been successful in that they are now perceived as the true (and only) open sourcerers.

Original title and link: Hortonworks: the Red Hat of Hadoop (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://siliconangle.com/blog/2014/04/16/hortonworks-the-red-hat-of-hadoop-rhsummit/


The Forrester Wave for Hadoop market

Update: I’d like to thank the people that pointed out in the comment thread that I’ve messed up quite a few aspects in my comments about the report. I don’t believe in taking down posts that have been out for a while, so please be warned that basically this article can be ignored.

Thank you and my apologies for those comments that were a misinterpretation of the report..


This is the Q1 2014 Forrester Wave for Hadoop:

Forrester wave for Hadoop

A couple of thoughts:

  1. Cloudera, Hortonworks, MapR are positioned very (very) close.

    1. Hortonworks is position closer to the top right meaning they report more customers/larger install base
    2. MapR is higher on the vertical axis meaning that MapR’s strategy is slightly better.

      For me, MapR’s strategy can be briefly summarized as:

      1. address some of the limitations in the Hadoop ecosystem
      2. provide API-compatible products for major components of the Hadoop ecosystem
      3. use these Apache product (trade marked) names to advertise their products

      I think the 1st point above explains the better positioning of MapR’s current offering.

    3. Even if Cloudera has been the first pure-play Hadoop distribution it’s positioned behind behind both Hortonworks and MapR.

  2. IBM has the largest market presence. That’s a big surprise as I’m very rarely hearing clear messages from IBM.

  3. IBM and Pivotal Software are considered to have the strongest strategy. That’s another interesting point in Forrester’s report. Except the fact that IBM has a ton of data products and that Pivotal Software is offering more than Hadoop, I don’t know what exactly explains this position.

    The Forrester report Strategy positioning is based on quantifying the following categories: Licensing and pricing, Ability to execute, Product road map, Customer support. IBM and Pivotal are ranked the first in all these categories (with maximum marks for the last 3). As a comparison Hortonworks has 3/5 for Ability to execute — this must be related only to budget; Cloudera has 3/5 for both Ability to execute and Customer support.

    Pivotal is the 3rd last in terms of current offering. I guess my hypothesis for ranking Pivotal as 1st in terms of strategy is wrong.

  4. Microsoft who through the collaboration with Hortonworks came up with HDInsight, which basically enabled Hadoop for Excel and its data warehouse offering, it positioned the 2nd last on all 3 axes.

    No one seems to love Microsoft anymore.

  5. While not a pure Hadoop player, DataStax has been offering the DataStax Enterprise platform that includes support for analytics through Hadoop and search through Solr for at least 2 years. That’s actually way before anyone else from the group of companies in the Forrester’s report had anything similar1.

    This report focuses only on “general-purpose Hadoop solutions based on a differentiated, commercial Hadoop distribution”.

You can download the report after registering on Hortonwork’s site: here.


  1. DataStax is my employer. But what I wrote is a pure fact. 

Original title and link: The Forrester Wave for Hadoop market (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Hortonworks raises $100M to grow engineering and company's ecosystem globally

Derrick Harris for GigaOm has the scoop:

Hadoop vendor Hortonworks has raised $100 million in a new round of venture capital led by BlackRock and Passport Capital. The company’s existing investors — Dragoneer, Tenaya Capital, Benchmark, Index Ventures and Yahoo — also participated in the latest round. Hortonworks CEO Rob Bearden said in an interview that the new funding will help Hortonworks scale its engineering efforts, grow the company’s ecosystem and scale its global operations.

Last week’s round E for Cloudera turned up to be $160 instead of the Bloomberg rumored $200.

These big rounds raised by the Hadoop pure-players are a confirmation of the Hadoop market. But I also think they can be explained by the tough competition Cloudera and Hortonworks are facing from large corporations like IBM, Teradata, Oracle, Microsoft. At least in terms of budget.

✚ While some of the above mentioned companies are partnering with at least one pure-play Hadooper — Cloudera, Hortonworks, MapR — that doesn’t mean they are not keeping an eye on the prize.

Original title and link: Hortonworks raises $100M to grow engineering and company’s ecosystem globally (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://gigaom.com/2014/03/24/hortonworks-raises-100m-to-scale-its-hadoop-business/


Examples of analytics applications across industries

A great matrix of the different analytics use cases across industries in Hortonworks’s post “Enterprise Hadoop and the Journey to a Data Lake“:

Anaylitcs use cases

The data type column section covers multiple dimensions of data. And the authors took a conservative approach for the structured and unstructured categories (in the sense that they marked very few categories as unstructured).

A couple of interesting exercises that can be done using this matrix as an input:

  1. figure out how adding data from different categories to a specific use case would benefit it. One obvious example is: how would Telecom companies benefit from adding to their infrastructure analysis social data?

    Building on the above, decide what tools exist to help with this extra scenario.

  2. can one use case from an industry be applied to a different industry to disrupt it?

    What would be the quickest road to accomplish it?

Original title and link: Examples of analytics applications across industries (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Enterprise Hadoop Market in 2013: Reflections and Directions

By end of last year, Shaun Connoly (Hortonworks) has posted a fantastic blog looking at the Hadoop market and its future, reflecting on the open source community and its ability to continuously innovate at a fast pace, and putting all these in perspective from a business point of view using the vistory of RedHat.

It is a must read.

Peter Goldmacher (analyst Cowen & Co):

“We believe Hadoop is a big opportunity and we can envision a small number of billion dollar companies based on Hadoop. We think the bigger opportunity is Apps and Analytics companies selling products that abstract the complexity of working with Hadoop from end users and sell solutions into a much larger end market of business users. The biggest opportunity in our mind, by far, is the Big Data Practitioners that create entirely new business opportunities based on data where $1M spent on Hadoop is the backbone of a $1B business.”.

Original title and link: Enterprise Hadoop Market in 2013: Reflections and Directions (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://hortonworks.com/blog/enterprise-hadoop-market-in-2013-reflections-and-directions/


Stinger and Tez: a primer

Matthieu Lieber summarizes what he has learned from a talk by Alan Gates. If any of the following questions interests you, head to his post:

  1. What is Stinger?
  2. Why build upon Hive rather than build a new system?
  3. Why is SQL compatibility important?
  4. What is Tez and how does it related to the Stinger initiative?
  5. What Tez means for Pig and other tools?

Original title and link: Stinger and Tez: a primer (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Apache Ambari is now an Apache Top Level Project

Hortonworks:

We are very excited to announce that Apache Ambari has graduated out of Incubator and is now an Apache Top Level Project!

Ambari is a framework for provisioning, managing, and monitoring Hadoop clusters.

✚ Such a tool is usually part of the distributions of Hadoop and in some cases it comes in a proprietary form.

Original title and link: Apache Ambari is now an Apache Top Level Project (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://hortonworks.com/blog/apache-ambari-graduates-to-apache-top-level-project/


Results of collaboration on improving the Mean Time to Recovery in HBase

Hortonworks, eBay and Scaled Risk have been collaborating in improving the mean time to recovery in HBase and after long testing performed at eBay, some results are now available for 2 scenarios:

  • Node/RegionServer failures while writing
  • Node/RegionServer failures while reading

Original title and link: Results of collaboration on improving the Mean Time to Recovery in HBase (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


A prolific season for Hadoop and its ecosystem

In 4 years of writing this blog I haven’t seen such a prolific month:

  • Apache Hadoop 2.2.0 (more links here)
  • Apache HBase 0.96 (here and here)
  • Apache Hive 0.12 (more links here)
  • Apache Ambari 1.4.1
  • Apache Pig 0.12
  • Apache Oozie 4.0.0
  • Plus Presto.

Actually I don’t think I’ve ever seen such an ecosystem like the one created around Hadoop.

Original title and link: A prolific season for Hadoop and its ecosystem (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Everything you ever wanted to know about Hortonworks

Derrick Harris and Hortonworks CEO Rob Bearden talked in an interview about:

Top personnel have changed places without so much as a press release, venture capital investment hasn’t been disclosed, and there are semi-regular rumors about the company spurning acquisition offers (namely from Microsoft and Intel).

Interesting bits:

  1. the first round of founding Hortonworks raised from Yahoo! and Benchmark, the round that everyone speculated about as it wasn’t disclosed, was $23mil;
  2. Hortonworks is planning to IPO in “five to seven quarters”. That’s a pretty aggressive plan. And I still believe that they’ll take a different route.
  3. About Eric Baldeschwiler’s departure: “Very candidly… Eric just got frustrated that he didn’t have the control that he once had.”

Original title and link: Everything you ever wanted to know about Hortonworks (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://gigaom.com/2013/08/20/everything-you-ever-wanted-to-know-about-yahoo-spinoff-hortonworks/


Hortonworks wishing Eric Baldeschwieler well

Three sentences in a 5 paragraphs post from Hortonwork’s CEO about Eric Baldeschwieler departure:

I’d like to start off first by thanking Eric for his contributions to the Hadoop community since its inception over 7 years ago, and I’d like to express my personal appreciation for his help in getting Hortonworks off the ground.

This smells like a not so friendly breakup.

✚ The first to notice this change was Derrick Harris on GigaOm.

✚ The new Hortonworks CTO is Ari Zilka (previously founder and CTO of IMDG Terracotta, but at the time already working at Hortonworks)

Original title and link: Hortonworks wishing Eric Baldeschwieler well (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://hortonworks.com/blog/wishing-eric-well/


Instead of an acquisition, Hortonworks announces $50 million in new financing

We are delighted to announce a new round of funding led by new investors Tenaya Capital and Dragoneer Investment Group, with participation from our existing investors Benchmark Capital, Index Ventures and Yahoo!.

I guess the rumors about a possible acquisition of Hortonworks aren’t true.

✚ If you are interested to see the history of rounds of the three major Hadoop players, here’s a summary:

Cloudera: $141M

  • 2009: $5M
  • 2009: $6M
  • 2010: $25M
  • 2011: $40M
  • 2012: $65M

Hortonworks: $70M

  • 2011: $20M
  • 2013: $50M

MapR: $52M

  • 2011: $20M
  • 2013: $32M

Note: the data I had for the MapR raises $30mil in Series C seems to be a bit different to the data I’ve collected today.

Original title and link: Instead of an acquisition, Hortonworks announces $50 million in new financing (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://hortonworks.com/blog/hortonworks-announces-50-million-in-new-financing-and-welcomes-new-investors-to-accelerate-next-phase-of-growth/