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Gremlin: All content tagged as Gremlin in NoSQL databases and polyglot persistence

Short Intro to Graph Databases, Manipulating and Traversing With Gremlin

A slide deck by Pierre De Wilde with a short theoretical intro to property graphs and graph databases and an extensive set of examples of manipulating and traversing graph data with Gremlin. Good reference material.


Gremlin vs Cypher

Romiko Derbynew comparing Gremlin and Neo4j Cypher:

  • Simple graph traversals are much more efficient when using Gremlin
  • Queries in Gremlin are 30-50% faster for simple traversals
  • Cypher is ideal for complex traversals where back tracking is required
  • Cypher is our choice of query language for reporting
  • Gremlin is our choice of query language for simple traversals where projections are not required
  • Cypher has intrinsic table projection model, where Gremlins table projection model relies on AS steps which can be cumbersome when backtracking e.g. Back(), As() and _CopySplit, where cypher is just comma separated matches
  • Cypher is much better suited for outer joins than Gremlin, to achieve similar results in gremlin requires parallel querying with CopySplit, where as in Cypher using the Match clause with optional relationships
  • Gremlin is ideal when you need to retrieve very simple data structures
  • Table projection in gremlin can be very powerful, however outer joins can be very verbose

So in a nutshell, we like to use Cypher when we need tabular data back from Neo4j and is especially useful in outer joins.

Patrick Durusau

Original title and link: Gremlin vs Cypher (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://romikoderbynew.com/2012/02/22/gremlin-vs-cypher-initial-thoughts-neo4j/


InfiniteGraph 2.1 Features Gremlin Support and a Plugin Framework

A new version of InfiniteGraph, the graph database from Objectivity, was announced today. This release features:

  • a plugin framework: Two kinds of plugins are supported. A navigator plugin bundles components that assist in navigation queries, such as result qualifiers, path qualifiers, and guides. The Formatter plugin formats and outputs results of graph queries.
  • enhanced IG Visualizer: The advanced Visualizer is now tightly integrated with InfiniteGraph’s Plugin Framework allowing indexing queries for edges, the Formatter plugin framework export GraphML and JSON (built-in) or other user defined plugin formats.
  • support for Tinkerpop Blueprints and Gremlin: InfiniteGraph provides a clean integration with Blueprints that is well suited for applications that want to traverse and query graph databases using Gremlin

A bit more details can be found in the InfiniteGraph 2.1 release notes.

Klint Finley

Original title and link: InfiniteGraph 2.1 Features Gremlin Support and a Plugin Framework (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Neo4j on Heroku: Building a Movie Recommendation Website for $0.00

Recently Max de Marzi has published sort of a getting started with Neo4j on Heroku guide. Here is how Max described it:

It takes a lot less effort to build a website these days than it used to. All it takes is a clever dwarf standing on the shoulders of the right giants. In a series of blog posts, I walk you through creating a movie recommendation website using Neo4j, Heroku, themoviedb.org, Processing.js, GroupLens, Marko Rodriguez and Michael Aufreiter. Free database, free hosting, free movie posters, free visualization, free dataset, free recommendation algorithm, just need to add a little code to bring them all together and BYOP (bring your own popcorn).

This will not get you a Netflix or Amazon like recommendation engine, but using a similar approach could definitely tell if Muhammad Ali is truly the greatest.

Original title and link: Neo4j on Heroku: Building a Movie Recommendation Website for $0.00 (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Friend Recommendations Using Gremlin With Neography

Max De Marzi:

Gremlin is a domain specific language for traversing property graphs. Neo4j is one of the databases that can speak the gremlin language, and as promised I’ll show you how you can use it to implement friend recommendations as well as degrees of separation.

Original title and link: Friend Recommendations Using Gremlin With Neography (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://maxdemarzi.com/2012/01/06/gremlin-with-neography/


An Intro to Gremlin the Graph Traversal Language

A nice intro to Gremlin, the Groovy-based graph traversal language supporting Neo4j, OrientDB, DEX, RDF Sail, TinkerGraph, and ReXster:

Next thing you should do is take your favorite graph database and try out Gremlin.

Original title and link: An Intro to Gremlin the Graph Traversal Language (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Pacer: Gremlin with Ruby Flavor

Sounds like ☞ Gremlin with Ruby’s syntactic sugar:

Let’s get two very fundamental differences out of the way first. First, Pacer uses Ruby as it’s language, employing method chaining to define traversal routes while Gremlin defines its own using a combination of xpath-like traversal definitions with its own procedural syntax for other functions. Secondly, Pacer does not have the concept of a current vertex or a current graph; the starting point of any traversal is explicit and there are no special variables like Gremlin’s $g and $.

@peterneubauer

Original title and link: Pacer: Gremlin with Ruby Flavor (NoSQL databases © myNoSQL)

via: http://ofallpossibleworlds.wordpress.com/2010/12/19/introducing-pacer/


Try Neo4j and Gremlin

After the model set by Try MongoDB website — which provides a very simple way to play with MongoDB, followed shortly by Try Redis, now it is time for graph databases to offer ☞ a simple online tool to play around with Neo4j and Gremlin.