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GraphDB: All content tagged as GraphDB in NoSQL databases and polyglot persistence

Neo4j Blog: Reloading my Beergraph - using an in-graph-alcohol-percentage-index

Rik Van Bruggen about data modeling in Neo4j:

One of the things that spurred the discussion was - probably not coincidentally - the AlcoholPercentage. Many people were expecting that to be a property of the Beerbrand - but instead in my beergraph, I had “pulled it out”. The main reason at the time was more coincidence than anything else, but when you think of it - it’s actually a fantastic thing to “pull things out” and normalise the data model much further than you probably would in a relational model. By making the alcoholpercentage a node of its own, it allowed me to do more interesting queries and pathfinding operations - which led to interesting beer recommendations. Which is what this is all about, right?

I can see where this is going, but I’m not sure I agree it’s the right approach. Basically in this case it works because the domain of the field is both discrete and small. Ideally, though, what you’d actually want is an index that could give you nodes that are “close-to-some value” (e.g.: “give me the beers in the 6.9-7.1 range”)

Original title and link: Neo4j Blog: Reloading my Beergraph - using an in-graph-alcohol-percentage-index (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://blog.neo4j.org/2013/05/reloading-my-beergraph-using-in-graph.html


Bootstrapping Neo4j With Spring-Data...without XML

The emphasis is on without XML:

With the maturing of Spring-Data I started porting all my personal projects to use Spring Data for bootstrapping.

Quite a bit of annotations needs, but I’d go with that instead of XML.

Original title and link: Bootstrapping Neo4j With Spring-Data…without XML (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://codepitbull.wordpress.com/2013/05/12/bootstrapping-neo4j-with-spring-data-without-xml/


A Quick Guide to Testing Spring Data Neo4j With NoSQLUnit

Alex Soto:

Spring Data Neo4j is the project within Spring Data project which provides an extension to the Spring programming model for writing applications that uses Neo4j as graph database. To write tests using NoSQLUnit for Spring Data Neo4j applications, you do need nothing special apart from considering that Spring Data Neo4j uses a special property called type in graph nodes and relationships which stores the fully qualified classname of that entity.

Is there a BigDataUnit framework? My only requirement is to use XML. Heavily.

Original title and link: A Quick Guide to Testing Spring Data Neo4j With NoSQLUnit (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://www.javacodegeeks.com/2013/03/testing-spring-data-neo4j-applications-with-nosqlunit.html


Neo4j-Based Bitcoin Block Chain Visualizer

Pretty interesting usage of Neo4j for visualizing Bitcoin block chain:

BlockViewer

Source code available on GitHub.

Original title and link: Neo4j-Based Bitcoin Block Chain Visualizer (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: https://github.com/thallium205/BitcoinVisualizer


Adding Value Through Graph Analysis Using Titan and Faunus

Interesting slidedeck by Matthias Broecheler introducing 3 graph-related tools developed by Vadas Gintautas, Marko Rodriguez, Stephen Mallette and Daniel LaRocque:

  1. Titan: a massive scale property graph allowing real-time traversals and updates
  2. Faunus: for batch processing of large graphs using Hadoop
  3. Fulgora: for global running graph algorithms on large, compressed, in-memory graphs

The first couple of slides are also showing some possible use cases where these tools would prove their usefulness:

Original title and link: Adding Value Through Graph Analysis Using Titan and Faunus (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


A Human-Readable Jackrabbit Persistence Manager Prototype for Orientdb

Jackrabbit still has a very special place in my heart. I’ve fought it many times, sometimes losing, most of the time winning. But for over 7 years now, it is still the main storage engine serving the content of InfoQ. So this OrientDB engine for Jackrabbit by Thomas Kratz caught my attention:

This has some limitations, as jackrabbit will still access only one node at a time, being able to traverse the graph at the storage level is simply not intended by the whole api. But it works, it’s readable, can be modified at the db level easily.

Original title and link: A Human-Readable Jackrabbit Persistence Manager Prototype for Orientdb (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://thomaskratz.blogspot.de/2013/01/a-human-readable-jackrabbit-persistence.html


Neo4j Interviews: The Vision, the Business and Enterprise Talk, and the Tech

Over the weekend I’ve watched two interviews with people working on Neo4j. Each of them covers it from a different angle: Ian Robison’s interview is the technical one, while Emil Eifrem is giving more of the vision, business, enterprise interview. Pick the type of topic you like and watch it. Both are great though.

If you like going back in time, I’ve found a couple of old presentations from and interviews with Emil Eifrem:

Original title and link: Neo4j Interviews: The Vision, the Business and Enterprise Talk, and the Tech (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Using Treetop and Neo4j Cypher to Simulate Facebook Graph Search

Interesting as an exercise considering Max de Marzi shared all the code on GitHub, but completely unrelated to the breadth and depth of the Facebook Graph Search.

Original title and link: Using Treetop and Neo4j Cypher to Simulate Facebook Graph Search (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://maxdemarzi.com/2013/01/28/facebook-graph-search-with-cypher-and-neo4j/


Neo Technology Is H… Wait, It’s Building Neo4j-As-A-Service

Neo Technology’s hiring announcement is clear about their intention:

“[…] you will be resonsible for building, managing, and maintaining a 24x7 NOSQL Databases-as-a-Service operation […]”

In the graph databases space, OrientDB is offering a hosting solution NuvolaBase, but I have no numbers about their business so far.

Original title and link: Neo Technology Is H… Wait, It’s Building Neo4j-As-A-Service (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


Linkurious: Visualize Graph Data Easily

Nice tool for visualizing and exploring graph databases:

linkurious-screenshot-12-e1354194477174

Currently it supports only Neo4j, but it can be extended to other graph databases.

Original title and link: Linkurious: Visualize Graph Data Easily (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://linkurio.us/


On Graph Computing: Practical Applications and Graph Computing Technologies

Marko A. Rodriguez in a must-read-must-bookmark-must-print article about graphs, graph processing, their applicability, and related technologies:

The concept of a graph has been around since the dawn of mechanical computing and for many decades prior in the domain of pure mathematics. Due in large part to this golden age of databases, graphs are becoming increasingly popular in software engineering. Graph databases provide a way to persist and process graph data. However, the graph database is not the only way in which graphs can be stored and analyzed. Graph computing has a history prior to the use of graph databases and has a future that is not necessarily entangled with typical database concerns. There are numerous graph technologies that each have their respective benefits and drawbacks. Leveraging the right technology at the right time is required for effective graph computing.

Original title and link: On Graph Computing: Practical Applications and Graph Computing Technologies (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://markorodriguez.com/2013/01/09/on-graph-computing/


A Comparison of 7 Graph Databases

The main page of InfiniteGraph, a graph database commercialized by Objectivity, features an interesting comparison of 7 graph databases (InfiniteGraph, Neo4j, AllegroGraph, Titan, FlockDB, Dex, OrientDB) based on 16 criteria: licensing, source, scalability, graph model, schema model, API, query method, platforms, consistency, concurrency (distributed processing), partitioning, extensibility, visualizing tools, storage back end/persistency, language, backup/restore.

7 graph databases

Unfortunately the image is almost unreadable, but Peter Karussell has extracted the data in a GoogleDoc spreadsheet embedded below.

Original title and link: A Comparison of 7 Graph Databases (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)