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FlockDB: All content tagged as FlockDB in NoSQL databases and polyglot persistence

A Comparison of 7 Graph Databases

The main page of InfiniteGraph, a graph database commercialized by Objectivity, features an interesting comparison of 7 graph databases (InfiniteGraph, Neo4j, AllegroGraph, Titan, FlockDB, Dex, OrientDB) based on 16 criteria: licensing, source, scalability, graph model, schema model, API, query method, platforms, consistency, concurrency (distributed processing), partitioning, extensibility, visualizing tools, storage back end/persistency, language, backup/restore.

7 graph databases

Unfortunately the image is almost unreadable, but Peter Karussell has extracted the data in a GoogleDoc spreadsheet embedded below.

Original title and link: A Comparison of 7 Graph Databases (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)


FlockDB and Graph Databases

Michael Marr:

The biggest difference between FlockDB and other graph databases like Neo4j and OrientDB is graph traversal. Twitter’s model has no need for traversing the social graph. Instead, Twitter is only concerned about the direct edges (relationships) on a given node (account).

Without traversals it is only a persisted graph. But not a graph database.

Original title and link: FlockDB and Graph Databases (NoSQL databases © myNoSQL)

via: http://www.devwebpro.com/exploration-of-nosql-flockdb/


Hadoop and NoSQL Databases at Twitter

Three presentations covering the various NoSQL usages at Twitter:

  1. Kevin Weil talking about data analysis using Scribe for logging, base analysis with Pig/Hadoop, and specialized data analysis with HBase, Cassandra, and FlockDB on InfoQ

  2. Ryan King’s presentation from last year’s QCon SF NoSQL track on Gizzard, Cassandra, Hadoop, and Redis on InfoQ

  3. Dmitriy Ryaboy on Hadoop from Devoxx 2010:

By looking at the powered by NoSQL page and my records, Twitter seems to be the largest adopter of NoSQL solutions. Here is an updated version of who is using Cassandra and HBase

  • Twitter: Cassandra, HBase, Hadoop, Scribe, FlockDB, Redis
  • Facebook: Cassandra, HBase, Hadoop, Scribe, Hive
  • Netflix: Amazon SimpleDB, Cassandra
  • Digg: Cassandra
  • SimpleGeo: Cassandra
  • StumbleUpon: HBase, OpenTSDB
  • Yahoo!: Hadoop, HBase, PNUTS
  • Rackspace: Cassandra

And probably many more missing from the list. But that could change if you leave a comment.

Original title and link: Hadoop and NoSQL Databases at Twitter (NoSQL databases © myNoSQL)


Implementing a Social Graph using Redis

We’ve seen before a Redis snippet for storing the social graph, this one in PHP:

The trick to implementing the social graph is using the built-in Set datatype in Redis.  In short, a set is an unordered collection of binary-safe strings. These strings are grouped together using a key as the index.  The great thing about sets is that the most used operations are performed in O(1) (constant) time.  More complex operations have slightly worse runtimes, such as determining common followers among a set of users, which runs in O(n * m).

As regards those “more complex operations, you might want to check the Redis SINTER/set intersection performance.

Original title and link: Implementing a Social Graph using Redis (NoSQL databases © myNoSQL)

via: http://blog.meltingice.net/programming/implementing-social-graph-redis/