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Inside Match.com

The article doesn’t get into the technical details[1], but this sounds like a BigData scenario with offline batch processing, where Hadoop is “the solution”:

The way the Match algorithm learns, he says, is similar to the way the human brain learns. “When you give it stimuli, it forms neural pathways,” he says. “If you stop liking something, those shut off. It’s learning as you go.” The same principles are powering the recommendation engines at popular sites around the web. Amazon uses similar ˇtechnology to recommend new products for people to buy, Pandora learns from likes and dislikes to customise its internet radio stations, and Netflix famously offered $1m to anyone who could improve the effectiveness of its algorithm by 10 per cent.


  1. I’d really like to know more about the technologies used at Match.com.  

Original title and link: Inside Match.com (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/f31cae04-b8ca-11e0-8206-00144feabdc0.html