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The Forrester Wave for Hadoop market

Update: I’d like to thank the people that pointed out in the comment thread that I’ve messed up quite a few aspects in my comments about the report. I don’t believe in taking down posts that have been out for a while, so please be warned that basically this article can be ignored.

Thank you and my apologies for those comments that were a misinterpretation of the report..


This is the Q1 2014 Forrester Wave for Hadoop:

Forrester wave for Hadoop

A couple of thoughts:

  1. Cloudera, Hortonworks, MapR are positioned very (very) close.

    1. Hortonworks is position closer to the top right meaning they report more customers/larger install base
    2. MapR is higher on the vertical axis meaning that MapR’s strategy is slightly better.

      For me, MapR’s strategy can be briefly summarized as:

      1. address some of the limitations in the Hadoop ecosystem
      2. provide API-compatible products for major components of the Hadoop ecosystem
      3. use these Apache product (trade marked) names to advertise their products

      I think the 1st point above explains the better positioning of MapR’s current offering.

    3. Even if Cloudera has been the first pure-play Hadoop distribution it’s positioned behind behind both Hortonworks and MapR.

  2. IBM has the largest market presence. That’s a big surprise as I’m very rarely hearing clear messages from IBM.

  3. IBM and Pivotal Software are considered to have the strongest strategy. That’s another interesting point in Forrester’s report. Except the fact that IBM has a ton of data products and that Pivotal Software is offering more than Hadoop, I don’t know what exactly explains this position.

    The Forrester report Strategy positioning is based on quantifying the following categories: Licensing and pricing, Ability to execute, Product road map, Customer support. IBM and Pivotal are ranked the first in all these categories (with maximum marks for the last 3). As a comparison Hortonworks has 3/5 for Ability to execute — this must be related only to budget; Cloudera has 3/5 for both Ability to execute and Customer support.

    Pivotal is the 3rd last in terms of current offering. I guess my hypothesis for ranking Pivotal as 1st in terms of strategy is wrong.

  4. Microsoft who through the collaboration with Hortonworks came up with HDInsight, which basically enabled Hadoop for Excel and its data warehouse offering, it positioned the 2nd last on all 3 axes.

    No one seems to love Microsoft anymore.

  5. While not a pure Hadoop player, DataStax has been offering the DataStax Enterprise platform that includes support for analytics through Hadoop and search through Solr for at least 2 years. That’s actually way before anyone else from the group of companies in the Forrester’s report had anything similar1.

    This report focuses only on “general-purpose Hadoop solutions based on a differentiated, commercial Hadoop distribution”.

You can download the report after registering on Hortonwork’s site: here.


  1. DataStax is my employer. But what I wrote is a pure fact. 

Original title and link: The Forrester Wave for Hadoop market (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)