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Watching a presentation on Byzantine fault tolerance is similar to watching a foreign film

James Mickens in “The saddest moment“:

In conclusion, I think that humanity should stop publishing papers about Byzantine fault tolerance. I do not blame my fellow researchers for trying to publish in this area, in the same limited sense that I do not blame crackheads for wanting to acquire and then consume cocaine. The desire to make systems more reliable is a powerful one; unfortunately, this addiction, if left unchecked, will inescapably lead to madness and/or tech reports that contain 167 pages of diagrams and proofs. Even if we break the will of the machines with formalism and cryptography, we will never be able to put Ted inside of an encrypted, nested log, and while the datacenter burns and we frantically call Ted’s pager, we will realize that Ted has already left for the cafeteria.

One of the shortest and delightful articles about the complexity of distributed systems.

Original title and link: Watching a presentation on Byzantine fault tolerance is similar to watching a foreign film (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)