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Reactions to MySQL 5.6: Couchbase

Bob Wiederhold (Couchbase CEO) about MySQL 5.6, their use of the NoSQL term, and the PR message touting the new version as the solution “combining the best of both worlds”:

What we see is a whole new wave of applications that have very different requirements than applications had just a few years ago. More often than not they are cloud-based, need to support a huge and dynamically changing number of users, need to store huge amounts of data, and need a highly flexible data model that allows them to adjust to rapidly changing data capture requirements and process lots of semi-structured and unstructured data. The fundamentally different architectural decisions embedded in NoSQL technologies – along with the easy scalability, consistently high performance, and flexible data model advantages (along with all the other tradeoffs) NoSQL provides – are turning out to be a better fit for an increasing number of these applications.

That doesn’t mean MySQL (or relational databases) will go away or won’t play a significant role in the database industry in the future.

Bob Wiederhold is also interested in how Oracle positions their products in terms of NoSQL:

As a side note it’s curious that the MySQL team seems out of step with other parts of Oracle. While the MySQL team seems to be convinced MySQL can do it all, Oracle’s NoSQL team seems to feel differently and is busily trying to catch up to NoSQL leaders like Couchbase, MongoDB, and Cassandra with their own NoSQL product. If relational technology is a one size fits all technology, why is Oracle itself making such a big investment in developing its own NoSQL product?

My supposition, expressed in the post MySQL 5.6 - What’s new, is that NoSQL is just a critical checkbox on the marketing and sales departments. Oracle NoSQL database and its precursor BerkleyDB seem to silently live inside the giant.

Original title and link: Reactions to MySQL 5.6: Couchbase (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://blog.couchbase.com/why-mysql-56-no-real-threat-nosql