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Counterpoint: Why Some Hadoop Adapters Make *Perfect* Sense

Jeff Darcy’s reply to Daniel Abadi’s “Why Database-To-Hadoop Connectors Are Fundamentally Flawed and Entirely Unnecessary“:

Going back to Daniel’s argument, RDBMS-to-Hadoop connectors are indeed silly because they incur a migration cost without adding semantic value. Moving from one structured silo to another structured silo really is a waste of time. That is also exactly why filesystem-to-Hadoop connectors do make sense, because they flip that equation on its head — they do add semantic value, and they avoid a migration cost that would otherwise exist when importing data into HDFS. Things like GlusterFS’s UFO or MapR’s “direct access NFS” decrease total time to solution vs. the HDFS baseline.

Original title and link: Counterpoint: Why Some Hadoop Adapters Make *Perfect* Sense (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://hekafs.org/index.php/2012/07/do-hadoop-adapters-make-sense/