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What's the Current State of Graph Databases?

Jim Webber1 in an interview with Srini Penchikala for InfoQ:

The graph databases are odd, because they’ve actually decided to have a much more expressive data model compared to relational databases. So I think they are an oddity compared to the other three types of NoSQL stores, which means that when a developer first comes across them there is an awful lot of head scratching—you can see this haircut was completely caused by Neo4J. So I think compared to the other NoSQL stores, the graph database community is a little bit further behind in terms of adoption and penetration because they are a bit of an odd beast when you look at them first, “What would I use graphs for, they are those things I forgot from university, with that boring old guy doing math on the whiteboard”, on the blackboard even, I’m so old we had chalk, would you believe?

It’s almost always impossible for me to disagree with Jim. Expanding a bit on the quote above, I’d speculate that a bit of head scratching before adopting a new database is good as it means you’ll not see many improper use cases.


  1. Jim Webber: Chief Scientist at Neo Technology 

Original title and link: What’s the Current State of Graph Databases? (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://www.infoq.com/interviews/jim-webber-neo4j-and-graph-database-use-cases