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Amazon RDS: The Good and Bad of Hosted MySQL

Mostly is good:

RDS is pretty awesome — it’s basically a highly available MySQL setup with backups and optional goodness like read-slaves. RDS is one of the best services as far as Amazon Webservices are concerned: 90% of what anyone would need from RDS, Amazon allows you to do with a couple clicks.

but:

Aside from the monitoring and backup quirks, one of the real pain points of Amazon RDS is that a lot of the collective MySQL knowledge is not available to us. The knowledge which is manifested in books, blogs, various monitoring solutions and outstanding tools like Percona’s backup tools are not available to people who run Amazon RDS setups.

Most of the time is difficult to get access to your preferred tools from small service providers. Amazon cannot afford to include in their operations all available tools for MySQL. But I’m pretty sure they have a prioritized list of the most requested ones.

Original title and link: Amazon RDS: The Good and Bad of Hosted MySQL (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://till.klampaeckel.de/blog/archives/179-Hosted-MySQL-Amazon-RDS-and-backups.html