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Big Data Market Analysis: Vendors Revenue and Forecasts

I think this is the first extensive Big Data report I’m reading that includes enough relevant and quite exhaustive data about the majority of players in the Big Data market, plus some captivating forecasts.

As of early 2012, the Big Data market stands at just over $5 billion based on related software, hardware, and services revenue. Increased interest in and awareness of the power of Big Data and related analytic capabilities to gain competitive advantage and to improve operational efficiencies, coupled with developments in the technologies and services that make Big Data a practical reality, will result in a super-charged CAGR of 58% between now and 2017.

2011 Big Data Pure-Play Vendors Yealy Big Data Revenue

While there are many stories behind these numbers and many things to think about, here is what I’ve jotted down while studying the report:

  • it’s no surprise that “megavendors” (IBM, HP, etc.) account for the largest part of today’s Big Data market revenue
  • still, the revenue ratio of pure-players vs megavendors feels quite unbalanced: $311mil out of $5.1bil
    • the pure-player category includes: Vertica, Aster Data, Splunk, Greenplum, 1010data, Cloudera, Think Big Analytics, MapR, Digital Reasoning, Datameer, Hortonworks, DataStax, HPCC Systems, Karmasphere
    • there are a couple of names that position themselves in the Big Data market that do not show up in anywhere (e.g. 10gen, Couchbase)
  • this could lead to the conclusion that the companies that include hardware in their offer benefit of larger revenues
    • I’m wondering though what is the margin in the hardware market segment. While not having any data at hand, I think I’ve read reports about HP and Dell not doing so well due exactly to lower margins
    • see bullet point further down about revenue by hardware, software, and services
  • this could explain why so many companies are trying their hand at appliances
  • by looking at the various numbers you can see that those selling appliances usually have a large corporation behind supporting the production costs for hadware and probably the cost of the sales force
  • in the Big Data revenue by vendor you can find quite a few well-known names from the consulting segment
  • the revenue by type pie lists services as accounting for 44%, hardware for 31%, and software for 13% which might give an idea of what makes up the megavendors’ sales packages
    • most of the NoSQL database companies and Hadoop companies are mostly in the software and services segment

Great job done by the Wikibon team.

Original title and link: Big Data Market Analysis: Vendors Revenue and Forecasts (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)

via: http://wikibon.org/wiki/v/Big_Data_Market_Size_and_Vendor_Revenues