ALL COVERED TOPICS

NoSQL Benchmarks NoSQL use cases NoSQL Videos NoSQL Hybrid Solutions NoSQL Presentations Big Data Hadoop MapReduce Pig Hive Flume Oozie Sqoop HDFS ZooKeeper Cascading Cascalog BigTable Cassandra HBase Hypertable Couchbase CouchDB MongoDB OrientDB RavenDB Jackrabbit Terrastore Amazon DynamoDB Redis Riak Project Voldemort Tokyo Cabinet Kyoto Cabinet memcached Amazon SimpleDB Datomic MemcacheDB M/DB GT.M Amazon Dynamo Dynomite Mnesia Yahoo! PNUTS/Sherpa Neo4j InfoGrid Sones GraphDB InfiniteGraph AllegroGraph MarkLogic Clustrix CouchDB Case Studies MongoDB Case Studies NoSQL at Adobe NoSQL at Facebook NoSQL at Twitter

NAVIGATE MAIN CATEGORIES

Close

Hadoop Namenode High Availability Merged to HDFS Trunk

As I’m slowly recovering after a severe poisoning that I initially ignored but finally put me to bed for almost a week, I’m going to post some of the most interesting articles I’ve read while resting.

Hadoop Namenode’s single point of failure has always been mentioned as one of the weaknesses of Hadoop and also as a differentiator of other Hadoop-based commercial offerings. But now the Namenode HA branch was merged into trunk and while it will take a couple of cicles to complete the tests, this will become soon part of the Hadoop distribution.

Here’s Jitendra Pandey announcement on Hortonworks’s blog:

Significant enhancements were completed to make HOT Failover work:

  • Configuration changes for HA
  • Notion of active and standby states were added to the Namenode
  • Client-side redirection
  • Standby processing journal from Active
  • Dual block reports to Active and Standby

In a follow up post to Gartner’s article Apache Hadoop 1.0 Doesn’t Clear Up Trunks and Branches Questions. Do Distributions?, the advantage of using custom distributions will slowly vanish and the open source version will be the one you’ll want to have in production.

Original title and link: Hadoop Namenode High Availability Merged to HDFS Trunk (NoSQL database©myNoSQL)